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Health Benefits of Chicory Root

December 28, 2012




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Chicory root has a long history of providing support to liver problems. Ancient Romans used the herb to help cleanse the blood. Egyptians were known to consume chicory root in large amounts to help purify the liver and the blood. It’s popular today as a caffeine free replacement for coffee- you may have tried it if you’ve visited New Orleans.

Digestive Support


Chicory may provide direct functional support to the digestive reactions in the body. First of all, chicory root increases the flow of bile which supports digestion. Because extra bile helps break down fats, chicory root may help optimize blood composition and is worth consideration by anyone seeking to achieve optimal liver and gallbladder health.

Secondly, organic chicory root contains inulin, a soluble fiber that feeds digestive flora in the intestines. Many plants contain inulin, but chicory root has the highest concentration. Nourishing the healthy flora in the intestines enhances digestion. Furthermore, since inulin content is not digestible, the lack of glucose can help promote optimal blood sugar levels while also increasing stool bulk and consistency to help eliminate toxins efficiently.


Antioxidant Activity

Many herbs are high in antioxidants, which, in plants, often come in the form of compounds called phenolics. Chicory is a rich source of these and the protective effects polyphenols on the cardiovascular system is widely acknowledged. Chicory coffee has repeatedly been assessed for resistance to inflammation due to its phenolics and caffeic acid content. [1] Adding chicory root to the diet of lab rats significantly increased antioxidant levels in the blood. Researchers believe the benefit of dietary supplementation with chicory is because of its polyphenolic (antioxidant) compounds. [2]

Against Harmful Organisms


Having shown antibacterial activity, chicory root extract has generated interest for potential role against harmful organisms. [3] An Italian study found chicory root extract to have antifungal qualities in certain situations. [4] Chicory root is toxic to strains of Salmonella at high doses and a 28-day rat study found no treatment-related side effects from high doses of chicory root extract. [5]


Relation to the Liver

In addition to its beneficial antioxidant effect, chicory root provides functional support to the liver. [6] The Zoology Department at Mansoura University in Egypt concluded chicory has a promising role worth considering for halting oxidative stress and liver injury in some situations. [7] 


Your question: Have you ever consumed chicory? (post your comments below)

Sources:











  • University of Maryland Medical Center: Cough
  • "Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine"; Effect of Honey, Dextromethorphan, and No Treatment on Nocturnal Cough and Sleep Quality for Coughing Children and Their Parents
  • "Natural, Alternative and Complementary Health Care Practices"; Roxana Huebscher, Pamela A. Shuler; 2004
  • "1,801 Home Remedies: Trustworthy Treatments for Everyday Health Problems"; Reader's Digest; 2004
  • "Jude's Herbal Home Remedies"; Jude C. Williams, Jude Todd; 2002


  • Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/132856-natural-homemade-cough-remedies-suppressants/#ixzz2CXAWUfcW
    1. Schumacher E, Vigh E, Molnár V, Kenyeres P, Fehér G, Késmárky G, Tóth K, Garai J. Thrombosis preventive potential of chicory coffee consumption: a clinical study. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21425378
    2. Juśkiewicz J, Zary-Sikorska E, Zduńczyk Z, Król B, Jurgoński A. Physiological effects of chicory root preparations with various levels of fructan and polyphenolic fractions in diets for rats. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21452615
    3. Petrovic J, Stanojkovic A, Comic Lj, Curcic S. Antibacterial activity of Cichorium intybus. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15567253
    4. Mares D, Romagnoli C, Tosi B, Andreotti E, Chillemi G, Poli F. Chicory extracts from Cichorium intybus L. as potential antifungals. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16160773
    5. Schmidt BM, Ilic N, Poulev A, Raskin I. Toxicological evaluation of a chicory root extract. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17306431
    6. Atta AH, Elkoly TA, Mouneir SM, Kamel G, Alwabel NA, Zaher S. Hepatoprotective Effect of Methanol Extracts of Zingiber officinale and Cichorium intybus. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21694986
    7. Hassan HA, Yousef MI. Ameliorating effect of chicory (Cichorium intybus L.)-supplemented diet against nitrosamine precursors-induced liver injury and oxidative stress in male rats. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20478349















  • University of Maryland Medical Center: Cough
  • "Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine"; Effect of Honey, Dextromethorphan, and No Treatment on Nocturnal Cough and Sleep Quality for Coughing Children and Their Parents
  • "Natural, Alternative and Complementary Health Care Practices"; Roxana Huebscher, Pamela A. Shuler; 2004
  • "1,801 Home Remedies: Trustworthy Treatments for Everyday Health Problems"; Reader's Digest; 2004
  • "Jude's Herbal Home Remedies"; Jude C. Williams, Jude Todd; 2002

  • Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/132856-natural-homemade-cough-remedies-suppressants/#ixzz2CXAWUfcW
    _________________________________________________________________________

    About the Author: Dr. Group has studied natural healing methods for over 20 years and now teaches individuals and practitioners all around the world. He no longer sees patients but solely concentrates on spreading the word of health and wellness to the global community. Under his leadership, Global Healing Center, Inc. has earned recognition as one of the largest alternative, natural and organic health resources on the Internet.


    Read More: http://www.globalhealingcenter.com

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